Getting Started - change Vespene listen port/ logs


#1

Doh!

I have something else running on port 8000.

Can anyone point me at how to change it?

Also, where do I find any logs /var/log/vespene is empty for me right now?


#2

Hi @jhawkesworth,

When you are installing you get a chance to set the port in 0_common.sh, but afterward, the result of the configuration is a supervisord config file in /etc/vespene/supervisord.conf, that contains the port string.

Vespene runs as "vespene", so you have to pick a port above 1023.

/var/log/vespene files are mostly created and controlled by running the app through supervisor (which saves standard output there), so if you're not seeing any logs, that may be from running the webserver from the command line.

Let me know if that helps, and if not, what commands you are trying/running.

Thanks!


#3

Also if you are leaving the fileserving features turned on (which allows Vespene workers to serve up the build roots directly), there's another copy of the port setting you need to change in /etc/vespene/settings.d/workers.py.

You will need to restart Vespene after changing that setting.


#4

Thanks for this, I'm all configured for a different port now. Turns out I had more fundamental issues - postgres wasn't running.
I'm almost up and running now but for some reason vespene can't create the pid on startup.
That said I think I'm going to start again with a clean vm as all the issues so far have stemmed from it being old and having other stuff on it already.


#5

"I'm almost up and running now but for some reason vespene can't create the pid on startup."

Sounds like a permissions problem on the pidfile directory for sure. Let me know if you see it again and if so include the full error message and we can perhaps debug what happened.

Thanks!


#6

Thanks for this. I got this working in the end by doing the following.:

sudo mkdir /var/run/vespene
sudo chown vespene:vespene /var/run/vespene

sudo vi /etc/vespene/supervisord.conf
change
pidfile=/var/run/supervisord.pid
to
pidfile=/var/run/vespene/supervisord.pid

and then restart vespene

sudo systemctl restart vespene.service

No doubt there are better ways of doing this (and its a mystery why it wasn't necessary on my Bionic Ubuntu box, which just worked straight away) but it has got me up and running.


#7

What OS were you trying this on?

My runs through on CentOS 7 (stock install) and Bionic both didn't have permission problems here.

I think the pidfile should be in /var/run/vespene anyway, just to avoid any possible supervisor conflicts -- so that's a good change to make.


#8

It was a Centos 7.2 but its probably been hacked around on for too long to be a reliable reference point for anything else.


#9

Hmm, strange, maybe permissions on /var/run changed, good to know. Anybody else who hits a clean-install CentOS problem please give me a heads up!